Nadia had spent half of her life at the Van Wert County Humane Society Shelter before finding her forever home. Pictured are Kayla Mosure, who adopted Nadia, and her sons, Konner (left) and Caiden (right). (Photo courtesy of Jess Ritchey)
Nadia had spent half of her life at the Van Wert County Humane Society Shelter before finding her forever home. Pictured are Kayla Mosure, who adopted Nadia, and her sons, Konner (left) and Caiden (right). (Photo courtesy of Jess Ritchey)

VAN WERT – In February 2018, The Times Bulletin featured Van Wert Humane Society shelter dog Nadia who, at the time, had been a shelter resident for over half her life – 2.5 years. Around two months later, Nadia found her forever home when Kayla Mosure and her family adopted the pup.

When Mosure, her husband Jason, and their four boys, Caiden, Konner, Gage, and Carson, decided to adopt Nadia, they were just feeling the emotional loss of their family dog and wanted to open their home to a dog in need. Mosure found out about Nadia after a co-worker had mentioned her.

“My husband and I went to see her, got her outside, and played with her,” said Mosure. “Then we took the kids to the shelter to meet her. She did so good with him that we brought her home. We decided she was ours and we were keeping her.”

Mosure said that Nadia has been excellent with her children, cats, and other animals, despite not much being known about how she would react with them when she was at the shelter.

“She was very shy when we brought her home,” said Mosure. “She didn’t make a noise; you didn’t even know she was there. She kept to herself. Within the week, she started to come out of it. She loves to come up to people; she’s very welcoming, she really came out of her shell.”

When Mosure was in the process of adopting Nadia, she was told that Nadia didn’t play with toys, but after adjusting to her new home, she began to love playing and chewing. She said this is a testament to how much a dog can change after they are adopted.

“She’s very playful, whereas as first, she wasn’t,” said Mosure. “People overlook some shelter dogs because they think the dog is in there because they did something bad or because of the breed they are. A lot of the time, it’s just irresponsible people who have animals that shouldn’t have had them in the first place. Some are overlooked because of their age or their breed when they are actually some of the most loving dogs.”

“You have to be patient,” added Mosure. “When we first got Nadia we didn’t know how she was going to do. These dogs lived in a shelter; they are not used to living in a home. It’s different accommodations than living in a shelter. They have to relearn things.”

According to Humane Society Volunteer Jess Ritchey, Nadia was often overlooked because she had “several strikes against her.”

“The most common strikes against dogs staying for a long period of time in the shelter are being black, having some sort of behavior issues, whether that’s being hyperactive, having anxiety, or having any known experience with kids other animals or house training, and being a pit bull,” said Ritchey.

Nadia being a black, middle-aged, pitbull mix made it harder for her to find a home. But these were attributes that made Mosure and her family fall in love with Nadia.

“I’ve always had a love for dogs, pit bulls especially,” said Mosure. “She never struck me as anything was wrong with her like everybody says. She’s such a loving dog.”

Not only did Mosure open her home to Nadia, but she and her family have answered the call when other animals needed a home.

The family took in a turkey that fell off a slaughter truck. When the bird first came to them, it wasn’t in the best of shape, but today the turkey’s feathers have all grown back in, and she is healthy. They also took in a pair of pigs that needed to be rehomed when a family couldn’t take them with them.

“My husband and I love our animals,” said Mosure. “Our dream is to eventually get a big farm property with a barn and have a sanctuary for animals.”