Areas of snow from Saturday's snowstorm still lingers in parts of the area. That is all about to change as weather officials are predicting highs close to 50 degrees by the early part of next week. (DHI Media/Jim Langham)
Areas of snow from Saturday's snowstorm still lingers in parts of the area. That is all about to change as weather officials are predicting highs close to 50 degrees by the early part of next week. (DHI Media/Jim Langham)

VAN WERT – Earlier in the week, members of the National Weather Service had felt they were looking at a cold drop-off in temperatures sometime within the next few days. That has all changed now as current computer models are predicting yet another significant warm-up from Sunday through at least Tuesday, with high temperatures in the low to mid-50’s.

“It’s still the same pattern we’ve been looking at all winter,” said weather specialist Rick McCoy. “It looks like we’re not ready to shift out of that yet.”

A projected low of temperatures in the low 40’s for early next week could set an all-time “high” for overnight temperatures for that date.

For one of the first times this winter, daytime highs have been fairly close to normal this week, but nighttime temperatures continue to exceed normal. Very little precipitation is anticipated over the weekend into early next week although the upcoming weather trend could project a light mixture of rain and snow early in the weekend.

The weather service noted that the National Weather Service in South Bend, Indiana, is on the verge of reporting the warmest winter on record for that area. It is projected that by next Monday, South Bend will have an average temperature of 34 degrees for the first 65 days of meteorological winter. This will tie the second warmest since records began in 1893. The warmest was 1931-32 when the average temperature was 35.6 degrees.

In the meantime, Jim Noel, representing the Ohio State University Agronomic Crops Network, says that the weather, climate, and hydrology patterns still remain wet across the region, making the Midwest states vulnerable to wet conditions.

“The outlook for February calls for normal to slightly below normal temperatures with not too far from normal rainfall,” said Noel. “There is a chance February could be drier than normal but the chances are not high.

“The jet stream remains active from Japan across the North Pacific Ocean into North American but not as active as last year,” continued Noel. “Therefore, the spring outlook is for a chilly start but a warmer than normal finish.”

Noel hinted that there could be some spring planting challenges again as above normal rainfall is expected again during the planting season

“However it does not look as bad as 2019 at this time,” said Noel. “Many of the climate models show trends toward normal or below normal rainfall and hotter weather for summer which, if it comes, could create some challenges.”